Author: The Retro Rambler

I'm the Retro Rambler, and this is my online home where I relive all the stuff that made my childhood cool. I've never really grown up, and don't really want to either. Enjoy your stay here, and come back often to see the latest memories we're posting. Drop me a comment when something strikes you and we'll chat about it. Retro Ramblings....your childhood lives here.

A Collection of Pro Wrestling Advertisements from 1987

Being a big wrestling fan growing up, I bought all of the “Apter mags” I could get me hands on.  They were great for the news, which was already 3 months old by the time you read it, and the stories about my favorite wrestlers.  What I didn’t discover they were great for at the time was the advertisements found within.  Sure, I would see something advertised and drool over it, but I never gained the appreciation for all those ads until much later in life.

I was flipping through an issue of Pro Wrestling Illustrated the other day, and it was filled with cool ads that I thought I would share with you.  So here they are, a collection of pro wrestling ads from 1987.

Pro wrestling VHS tapes were the holy grail for a young wrestling fan like myself.  I wanted both of these tapes back in the day, but could never swing the ridiculous price to own them at the time.  Fortunately, I did get an uncut, satelite feed copy of Starrcade ’86 a few years ago.

And speaking of video tapes, here is a real gem!  For just $45.20 ($98.60 in 2018 dollars) I could have owned this awesome tape.  If you don’t know what this match is, it is the legendary, riot inducing, hair vs. hair steel cage match in Memphis TN. between Jerry “The King” Lawler and Austin Idol.  If you’ve not seen it, check it out here on YouTube, and be sure to watch for the surprise ending that caused the riot. Continue reading “A Collection of Pro Wrestling Advertisements from 1987”

Watch me Teach My Daughter How to Play POG’s!

So I recently picked up some POG’s off ebay, thinking I would do some kind of video with them.  My oldest daughter showed quite a curiosity in them, so what better thing to film than teaching her how to play the game.  So we pulled them out, set up the camera, and away we went.  Check it out, and if you played POG’s back in the day, leave a comment and we’ll talk about it!

You can also check out the post from a while back about the history of POG’s here on Retro Ramblings.

 

Retro Rewind Episode 12 – Opening a Pack of Batman Cards from 1989

Batman Trading Cards

 

Recently, I filmed another episode of my Retro Rewind show for YouTube, and it is another trading card wax pack opening.  The specimen this time out is a pack of Batman 2nd Series cards from 1989.  This card set was based on the mega-hit Batman movie that came out that year, and surprisingly, has a lot of cards that feature production shots and photos.  There are still action shots from the actual movie, but not as many as I would have thought.

So anyway, you can watch the video below where I open and go through the pack.  I hope you enjoy it, and if you do, please use the “Like” button, and subscribe to the channel.

 

8 Board Games I Love

Board games have long occupied space in closets and on book shelves, and have entertained families of all types and sizes for decades. While growing up, my brother and I spent many days and hours playing games, just like my daughters do today.

I admit, when the original Nintendo came along, I spent far less time with the conventional board game, and shifted most of my focus to video games. Even so, I have so many fond memories attached to board games, so here today I’m taking a trip down memory lane to look at six of my favorite board games from days gone by, and two more recent ones.


Monopoly

Monopoly

When I hear “board game”, Monopoly is the first thing that comes to mind. I would consider it the “Boardwalk” of board games, while all the others are “Vermont Ave” or “St. James Place”.

The current recognized version was first published in 1935 by Parker Brothers. It underwent a major resign in 2008 that saw Mediterranean and Baltic Avenues colors from purple to brown, and GO from red to black. It also changed the Income Tax to a flat $200, and upped Luxury Tax from the original $75 to $100.

When I was a kid, my family would play, but in the beginning, I was too young to be in on the game. When my time finally came, I instantly fell in love with it. I thought I was a big deal when I could barter my way to a “Get Out of Jail Free” card, or buy Oriental Ave. Unfortunately, I didn’t understand back then how the game worked and would usually be quickly put out of the game due to faulty business decisions.

As I grew older, I graduated from playing with family to playing with friends, where the playing field was a little more level. As an adult, my friends and I came up with a set of additional rules that we called “Survival Monopoly”. It threw in things like “everyone moves one chair to the left”, meaning that you now owned all of your neighbor’s property, and left yours behind to be taken over by someone else.

From the simple color schemes, to the simple rules, playing this board game these days always takes me back to another place in time. A place when I was sitting in front of the fire-place, with my brother and my folks enjoying the evening together. It’s one of the things that brings back some of the strongest feelings of nostalgia within me, and makes me ache to go back. But at the same time, the game helps me stay anchored in the present, as I love to play the game with my daughters. I see in their faces the same joys of playing the game that I have always experienced, and know that I am helping to create in them something that one day they will look back on with similar nostalgic feelings.

Continue reading “8 Board Games I Love”

Retro Rewind Episode 11: Retro Comic Book Ads Video

Episode 11 of my Retro Rewind show is now up on YouTube.  In this episode, we flip through an old comic book to take a look at all the cool old ads found inside.  I’ve done these type of posts here on the blog where I scan the ads and give a few sentences about them, but I thought it would be fun to try the concept in video form.  So you can watch the video below, and let me know what you think of the concept in this form.  Hopefully you like it, and if you do, please take a second and hit the LIKE button on the video, and be sure to subscribe to the channel so you don’t miss any future episodes.

 

Looking Back at Hulk Hogan’s Rock and Wrestling Cartoon

Hulk Hogans Rock and Wrestling

Professional wrestling had been around long before television, but the mid-80’s brought new levels of popularity to the much-maligned “sport.” Due to the business savvy of Vince McMahon, pro wrestling became one of the most successful entertainment ventures in the world. Relying heavily on the “good guy vs. bad guy” storyline and giving each wrestler ample time to speak to the viewers at home, McMahon’s World Wrestling Federation became a national phenomenon. It was only a matter of time before a Saturday morning cartoon was developed based on the WWF.

The show featured any wrestler who was popular at the time (Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka, The Junkyard Dog, etc.), but the focus was on the WWF’s biggest star, Hulk Hogan. Hogan, who was a positive role model for all, never turned down an opportunity to help out those in need, the springboard to the plots of most episodes. In many cases, Hogan was forced to ally himself and his “good guy” cronies with the “bad guy” wrestlers in order to get things done. The bad guys were usually only looking out for themselves and reverted to their abhorrent ways immediately after solving that week’s crisis.

 

More Saturday Morning Cartoons  |  Alvin and the Chipmunks

 

The series also featured live segments in which Hogan, along with announcer “Mean” Gene Okerlund, would relay a positive message to the kids, generally one that fit with the day’s episode. The show satisfied its “rock” quotient by featuring a montage of the wrestlers performing a variety of acts, backed up by popular tunes in highlight reel fashion. The concept for the series came from musician Cyndi Lauper, who often appeared in the cartoon as herself.

Amazingly enough, none of the wrestlers provided his or her own voice for the cartoon. Apparently, the eloquence they showed in pre- and post-match interviews was too difficult to capture in a voice-over studio. Hogan’s cartoon voice was performed by Brad Garrett, who would eventually find fame as Robert Barone on the popular CBS series Everybody Loves Raymond.

 

This post originally appeared on the long defunct Yesterdayland website.  We archive it here to preserve it.